Exhibits at the Mahwah Museum

The Mahwah Museum and Donald Cooper Model Railroad are now CLOSED for the Summer. We will reopen in September, 2017.

 

The Old Station Museum and Caboose will be open June 25, 2017- September 2017 Sundays 2-4 pm.

 

**Please note: We cannot process credit or debit cards inside the museum.***

We are featuring four exhibits for the 2017-2018 season, “Mahwah’s Herstory” and “Medicine in Mahwah”, “Kilmer, The Man” and “The First World War”.

The Mahwah Museum is located at 201 Franklin Turnpike, Mahwah, NJ 07430.

Admission to the museum is $5, free for museum members.

The first exhibit, “Mahwah’s Herstory: The Changing Roles of Women in Mahwah’s History”, examines the role of women in Mahwah’s history, starting with its first settler, Blandina Bayard, and continuing through to 1960. It highlights women’s activities, including  pioneering and farming, changing roles in the workforce, and women’s accomplishments in the arts, in charitable organizations and in social reforms. During the Summer this exhibit will be updated.

Our second exhibit, “Medicine in Mahwah”, highlights the history of medicine in Mahwah. It examines the growth and development of the medical field with highlights on Mahwah’s practitioners, their methods, and instruments throughout various periods. During the Summer this exhibit will be updated.

 Our first new exhibit “Kilmer, The Man” will focus on local Poet Joyce Kilmer. “A patriot and warrior, a poet and lectuered, a husband and a father, a sergeant in WWI.”

Our second new exhibit “The First World War” will document the role of Mahwah and Bergen county in the First World War. ” From Sarajevo to Versailles.”

 

When the Museum is reopened for the 2017-2018 season we will be featuring, aside from our new exhibits, our permanent exhibits:

Les Paul in Mahwah and The Donald Cooper Model Railroad, which is open weekends ONLY 1-4 pm (CURRENTLY CLOSED FOR THE SUMMER).

The Museum will be open weekends and Wednesdays from 1-4 pm.; admission is $5 for non-members; members and children are free. We are currently closed for the Summer and will reopen in September 2017.

Permanent exhibits:

The Donald Cooper Model Railroad

The Museum’s Donald Cooper Railroad is an operating HO-Scale model railroad with many trains traveling between levels and on different routes. Centralized electronic switches allow the operator to control the entire layout from the DCC central control panels. The railroad yard is fully functional allowing operators to make up trains and dispatch them to their own destinations. The four-level high layout has three independent scenic modules that are constantly changing, as well as a trolley, a subway system, logging station, waterfall, roundhouse and turntable. We invite engineers of all ages to come and visit our ever-changing and growing railroad world. The Donald Cooper Model Railroad is open weekends ONLY September-June from 1-4 p.m. For information about joining the train crew, please email director@mahwahmuseum.org or call 201-512-0099.

Les Paul in Mahwah

The Mahwah Museum has a small permanent exhibit featuring some Les Paul history  which allows visitors to learn the essential facts of Les Paul’s life and career.  It has sections on his inventions and innovations, a display of one-of-a-kind precious guitars made especially for Les, and a re-creation of the studio in which Les did his work.  Learn how this creative genius transformed rock, country and jazz music. See how he and Mary Ford performed for their weekly radio show from their home in Mahwah.

 

*** PLEASE NOTE***

The Play a Les Paul guitar at the Mahwah Museum session is NOT available during the Summer. The Mahwah Museum is closed through September and we will begin taking appointments again in September.

The Mahwah Museum receives operating support from the New Jersey Historical Commission in the Department of State.

Any Youngs, Hagermans, Bodines out there?

Any Youngs, Hagermans, Bodines out there?
The Mahwah Museum archives are processing a large collection of photographs from the Martha Young Kuklinski Collection which document the lives of J. Frank Young (1905-1960) and Henrietta Morriss Young (1909-1984) and their families, ranging 1910-1940s. There are also some older historical family photographs. Henrietta Morriss’ mother was Bessie Hagerman and she lived with Andrew Hagerman. The photos from this branch of the family are fairly well labeled. The photographs of the Youngs, who came from Tallman, often have no labels at all. J. Frank Young’s mother was Anne Jane Bodine and his father was John Franklin Young. His siblings were Alta, Freda, and John Young. If you can help up put names to faces, it would make this collection much more useful to researchers.
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A Look at Mahwah’s Inventors

For a 2015 gallery talk I profiled the following inventors. Click on the links for a short history of each:

A little bit about methodology. All of these inventors hold U.S. Patents on their inventions. I knew from my past research and work in our archives about some of them, so I was able to use Google Scholar (a website that I love) to locate their patents. Put their name, Mahwah and the word patent into the search and up pops reference to their patents and you can download a copy. Edward Gorcyca was unknown to me but his name came up in a search of Brakeshoe Patents Mahwah. Another longtime resident of Cragmere, Rosser Wilson, also came up with a lot of patents at Brakeshoe. Audrey Artusio and Mary Ellen Pryde were very helpful with Robert Armstrong Smith and John Edwards loaned me valuable material about his uncle, Charles Ellis. We have displayed some of his original patents, American and foreign at the gallery talk.

A little background about the patent system. Patents are authorized by Article I, Section 8, clause 8 of the United States Constitution which grants Congress the power to “promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” So under the system that Congress has established, an inventor submits an application to the U.S. Patent Office, an application. This application describes the invention, includes drawings when needed, and sets up the claims that the inventor is making. The claims portion is very important because the inventor gets exclusive rights only in the things he has actually claimed. Once the application has been filed, it is examined by the patent office before the actual patent is issued. The examiner has to determine whether the invention is “novel” and “nonobvious.” To determine whether an invention is “novel” a search is made of all previous patents to see that the new invention does not the same claims that were made before by someone else. The examiner also looks at whether the claims are so obvious that they are already in the public domain. Once the patent office determines to issue a patent it is good for 17 years. But it is subject to challenge by other inventors who can claim infringement of their existing patents. Just because someone has a patent on something doesn’t mean the product is ever made or becomes commercially viable. The filed patents are used by other inventors to improve upon the prior art.

All of the inventors that we will discuss today owned patents. The usual practice is that a patentee is an individual that gets the patent in his own name and then assigns it to the employer for whom he was working when the inventive work was done.

If you know of additional information about any of these inventors, or know of other inventors from Mahwah, please comment below.