Northwest Bergen History Coalition History Day 2019

NW Bergen History Day 2019

 

Unlock the Door to Local History

Tickets for History Day are now available for purchase at Mahwah Museum

History Day 2019, sponsored by the Northwest Bergen History Coalition, will be held on Saturday, May 4th from 11 AM to 4 PM.  For the price of $10, you can visit as many of the twelve NW Bergen museums and historic homes as you choose.

Each historic site will feature unique textiles, artifacts and ephemera and share information that will enhance your knowledge of Northwest Bergen County’s history. The museums and historic homes on the tour include:

       John Fell House 475 Franklin Turnpike in Allendale presenting a display of historic local maps, artifacts, and memorabilia in their new exhibit, “Maps and Memorabilia of Allendale and Surrounding Areas.”

      The Hermitage 335 N. Franklin Turnpike in HoHoKus showcasing their new exhibit on the life of Theodosia Prevost, who owned the Hermitage at the time of the Revolutionary War and later, married Aaron Burr.

      Mahwah Museum 201 Franklin Turnpike in Mahwah presenting an exhibit featuring citizens of Mahwah who served in the Great War including poet and soldier Joyce Kilmer who made the ultimate sacrifice.

      Van Allen House 3 Franklin Ave. in Oakland featuring a display of herbs and garden plants with a discussion of their traditional, medicinal, and historic uses.

      Old Stone House 538 Island Rd. in Ramsey opening with a special display of artifacts from a century of education in Ramsey in addition to their existing exhibits.

      Schoolhouse Museum 650 E. Glen Ave. in Ridgewood presenting an exhibit, “Here Comes the Bride,” with an exquisite collection of wedding dresses and accessories from 1780 through 1990.

      Hopper-Goetschius Museum 363 E. Saddle River Rd. in Upper Saddle River examining the earliest days in the Saddle River Valley and the lives of the Lenape Indians, the Europeans and African Americans.

     Waldwick Museum of Local History 4 Hewson Ave. in Waldwick will have as its main theme, the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of the Borough of Waldwick.   During the anniversary year a number of different exhibits will be on display celebrating the Borough’s history.

     Harvey Springstead Memorial Museum, 1 Bohnert Place in Waldwick featuring a display and discussion of the role of the railroad in the growth and development of Waldwick as the borough celebrates its 100th anniversary.

     Wyckoff Historical Society at Zabriskie Pond on Franklin Ave in Wyckoff welcoming visitors to a photographic exhibition, Faces and Places of Wyckoff, displayed in their newly renovated building that was once a barbershop.

     Zabriskie House 421 Franklin Ave. in Wyckoff will open the doors of this lovely historic home dating back to 1720 with its collection of historic and rare furnishings from the 17th to the 20th century.  The day will include demonstrations on spinning and weaving and children’s games.

 Tickets at $10 for an adult, free for children 16 and younger are now on sale at:

The Hermitage on Wednesdays through Sundays 1 to 4,

 Mahwah Museum on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays 1 to 4,

Abma’s Farm Market 700 Lawlins Road in Wyckoff  on Mondays through Saturdays 9:00 to 5:00,

and the Schoolhouse Museum on Thursdays and Saturdays from 1 to 3 and Sundays 2 to 4.

Tickets will also be on sale at each of the sites on History Day. All proceeds from ticket sales will benefit our historic sites.

Be a part of History Day 2019 and learn about local history at these wonderful museums and historic homes.

For more information about the day call Sheila Brogan at 201-652-7354 or email smbrogan@aol.com.

Gallery Talk- Lou Pallo, My Time with Les Paul

Gallery Talk
Lou Pallo- My Time with Les Paul

Photo by Shahar Azran/WireImage

On Sunday May 05, 2019 at 1:15 p.m.  Lou Pallo, Jazz guitarist and member of the Les Paul Trio will present a gallery talk about his time playing with his good friend, Les Paul. This talk will take place in the upstairs gallery of Mahwah Museum. Seating is limited; advanced reservations are recommended. To reserve, email gallerytalks@mahwahmuseum.org or call 201.512.0099. Gallery talks are free with museum admission.

Lou Pallo spent the longest time as a member of the Les Paul Trio. He is an accomplished Jazz guitarist, and  has recorded with and/or shared the stage with: Les Paul, Tony Bennett, Keith Richards, Sammy Davis, Jr. Rickie Lee Jones, John “Bucky” Pizzarelli and many others. He will share his many stories about playing with Les. Starting in the 1960’s when Les use to sit in at Molly’s Fish Market in Oakland, to joining the Trio in the 1980’s at Fat Tuesdays, to the move to the Iridium in 1995.  Lou was a constant until Les’ death in August 2009.

This gallery talk is hosted by Mahwah Museum, located at 201 Franklin Turnpike Mahwah, NJ 07430.  The Museum is currently featuring the exhibits Kilmer: The Man Kilmer: The War Years, and WWI Part I and WWI Part II. Permanent exhibits are Les Paul in Mahwah and The Donald Cooper Model Railroad, which is open weekends 1-4 pm. The Museum is open weekends and Wednesdays from 1-4 pm.; admission $5 for non-members, members and children are free. Visit www.mahwahmuseum.org or call 201-512-0099 for information on events, membership and volunteering.

Any Youngs, Hagermans, Bodines out there?

Any Youngs, Hagermans, Bodines out there?
The Mahwah Museum archives are processing a large collection of photographs from the Martha Young Kuklinski Collection which document the lives of J. Frank Young (1905-1960) and Henrietta Morriss Young (1909-1984) and their families, ranging 1910-1940s. There are also some older historical family photographs. Henrietta Morriss’ mother was Bessie Hagerman and she lived with Andrew Hagerman. The photos from this branch of the family are fairly well labeled. The photographs of the Youngs, who came from Tallman, often have no labels at all. J. Frank Young’s mother was Anne Jane Bodine and his father was John Franklin Young. His siblings were Alta, Freda, and John Young. If you can help up put names to faces, it would make this collection much more useful to researchers.
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Inventors: Edward Gorcyca

EdwardGorcyca-1

(www.jeffpolston.com)

Edward Gorcyca, of West Mahwah, was another one of those inventors from American Brakeshoe.  He was born in 1923 and served in the Navy from 1943-1945.  He died in 1996 in San Diego, California.

I don’t know too much about Ed’s life or background.  He was the second son of Myron (or Marion) and Anna Gorcyca who came to the U.S. from Poland in 1906.  In 1940 Myron was a coremaker at American Brakeshoe and, according to an oral history taken in 1975 with his daughter, Jenny (who married Larry Nyland, one of our Mayors) the family also had a subsistence farm on Church Street.  His brothers Ben and John were proteges of John Warhol and John was influential in persuading John to attend the University of Maryland.  Ben was the long time chairman of the Board of Adjustment and John ran for the office of tax collector.

One of Gorcyca's patents.

One of Gorcyca’s patents.

Between 1954 and 1965, Ed’s name appeared on five patents that were assigned to American Brakeshoe.  They all related to improvement of journal boxes, which contained oiled packing materials to lubricate the bearings of railroad wheels.  The picture shows a railroad employee inspecting the journal box on a wheel to make sure the packing was properly in place, because if it failed, the wheel bearings would burn out causing a “hotbox.”  Until 1961, the primary inventor was a man named Llewellyn Hoyer, with Ed as a co-inventor.  But the last two were in Ed’s name alone: for a clip to make keep the packing in place and a new dust guard that was easier to remove without disconnecting the entire journal box.

Inventors: The Havemeyers

Theodore Havermeyer (Suzanne Meyer Stein Collection, Mahwah Museum)

Theodore Havemeyer (Suzanne Meyer Stein Collection, Mahwah Museum)

Three generations of Havemeyers were inventors.  As you know, Theodore A. Havemeyer came to Mahwah in 1879 and established Mountain Side Farm, much of which is Ramapo College.  He died in 1897.  Although Theodore had nine children only his sons, Henry O. Havemeyer and Frederick C. Havemeyer, continued a presence in Mahwah.  Henry O. Havemeyer died in 1965 but his son, Henry O. Havemeyer, Jr. continued to live here until his death in 1992.  The house in which Henry Jr. lived became the home of the President of Ramapo College.  Theodore, Henry O., and Henry O., Jr. were all inventors.

 

Theodore Havermeyer's Sugar Mold Carriage patent

Theodore Havemeyer’s Sugar Mold Carriage patent

Theodore A. Havemeyer, born in 1839, had only a grammar school education but joined the family sugar business as a partner in 1861.  He was the technological expert in the family and an early age had spent a year in Europe studying the sugar refining process.  In 1862 he and a man named Schnitzpan patented a new and improved carriage for sugar molds.  He was a partner in Havemeyers & Elder, which was an integral part of the Sugar Trust.    In his later years in Mahwah he was a patron of many agricultural and scientific societies that were advancing the technology of agriculture.  He was on the forefront of ensilage– to generate feed for his cows—the breeding of cows to improve milk production, and the breeding of fantail pigeons for show.

 

Henry O. Havermeyer (On loan from the Mahwah Library)

Henry O. Havemeyer (On loan from the Mahwah Library)

Theodore Havemeyer’s son, Henry O. Havemeyer, dropped out of Yale in 1897 after the death of his father and became an apprentice at the family sugar business.  He returned to Yale and graduated as a proud member of the Class of 1900.   The Ramsey Journal reported in 1906 that he had gotten a speeding ticket in his newfangled automobile. So it is appropriate that he was the inventor of a license plate holder that could be flipped over so that it had the plate of one state on one side and the plate of another state on the reverse.  Henry O. Havemeyer was not merely a playboy, however.  He was the president of the Eastern District Terminal in Brooklyn which had been spun off from the family’s sugar business. He became an officer and later the long time president of the Eastern District Terminal.  The Eastern District Terminal was the gateway for all railroads coming from the west and seeking to be in Brooklyn or Long Island.  It was also the only way in which refined and packaged sugar could get from the Domino refinery in Brooklyn to the west.   They had to come through these yards and be moved by small locomotives like these.  It would be up to Henry O. Havemeyer, Jr. – who also worked for the company – to make some important advances.

Havermeyer House (Courtesy Dater Family Archives)

Havemeyer House (Courtesy Dater Family Archives)

There were no tunnels under the Hudson River so railroad cars were barged or lightered over from the yards of Jersey City, Bayonne or Hoboken, to the Eastern District Terminal and then transferred to the industries or railroads in Brooklyn.   To get one or more railroad cars across the river, there was a floating bridge connected to the tracks on the shore.  The barge connected to the water side of the bridge.  There were tracks on the barge to accept the car being transported.  You can imagine how difficult it must have been to transfer a fully loaded railroad car from tracks on the bridge to the tracks on the  rolling barge.  There were constant mishaps and derailments.  The invention of Henry O. Havemeyer, Jr., filed in 1925 when he was 22 years old, improves on the way that the rails on the bridge and barge could be aligned to make derailments rare.  Henry O. Havemeyer, Jr. lived in the house we today call the Havemeyer House and had a number of other inventions to improve railroad transportation.

Inventors: Fitzwilliam Sargent (1859-1939)

Fitzwilliam Sargent

Fitzwilliam Sargent

Fitzwilliam Sargent was called the “father of brake-shoe engineering” and he obtained multiple patents for improvement of railroad brake shoes. He was born in 1859 in Philadelphia and attended Lehigh University where he graduated in 1879 with a Civil Engineering degree. He came to Mahwah (then Hohokus Township) in 1902 as the chief engineer of the American Brake Shoe and Foundry Company.

After joining American Brake Shoe, he built a large home on 5 acres off Olney Road. The house had all the latest improvements of the day, including electric lights and steam heat.

In 1935 the Board of Directors of American Brakeshoe built an up-to-date testing facility to keep up with the progress of the railroad industry.  The building was named the F.W. Sargent Laboratory Building and from the opening of the building to the date of his death at the age of 80 he went to work as often as possible.  The picture below shows his first invention, which he had done before he came to Brakeshoe, of a machine for testing brakeshoes.  During his career, he had many patents relating to the improvement of brakeshoes.  His last patent was issued to him in 1934 at age 75.    The invention created a system of reinforcing a brake shoe so that, if the body of the shoe broke, it could continue in service and not need to be replaced as quickly.


Photos from Fitzwilliam Sargent Greene, `A Tribute to the Life of Fitzwilliam Sargent” (Mahwah Museum Library, 2013.17.072)

Inventors: Howard S. Avery

Howard S. Avery at American Brakeshoe

Howard S. Avery at American Brakeshoe

Between 1949 and 1982 he was granted at least 10 patents for metallurgy, welding rods and railroad track improvements that were assigned to American Brakeshoe. One of his primary focuses early on was in creating an alloy for a heat resistant manganese steel and then in figuring out how to make it machinable so that it could be used in Brakeshoe Products. His experiments on welding rods led to improvements in the ultimate weld. He was a recycler because one of his inventions was to take industrial scrap, containing sintered tungsten carbide and then converting it into tungsten oxide which, in turn would allow the recovery of tungsten metal.

Mr. Avery was a very active member of the Mahwah Community. He was the president of the Board of Education when the high school was designed and the papers he has given to the Museum reflect his disciplined, thorough and rapier sharp mind. He was a long time Scout leader and he has given us rare Scouting magazines, Troop 50 records, a detail for a few years of the proceeds of the Boy Scout Paper Drive that ultimately led to the recycling center. He was the head of civil defense which was an outgrowth of his interest in amateur radio which he developed at Virginia Tech. His Virginia Tech experience in the rifle club carried over to Mahwah where he tutored people like John Edwards in riflery.

Howard_Avery2

Diagram of Welding ____

In 1979 when the renovation of the high school was up for referendum, it was snowing hard. One of his neighbors called me and said that Mr. and Mrs. Avery wanted to vote, but were reluctant to go out. So I drove them to the polls. They were 2 of the 69 votes that provided the margin of victory.

Mrs. Avery died in 1985 at age 80 and Howard died in 1996 at age 90. He has given the Museum 25 boxes of materials about his life and interests in Mahwah. He also gave a large collection of his technical papers to Virginia Tech. That collection, incidentally, contains some folders with personal papers, particularly about scouting.


Images from the American Brakeshoe Collection, Mahwah Museum.

Tom Peters- My Les Paul Story

Les Paul with the Pulverizer

Les Paul with the Pulverizer

“I lived in Mahwah in the ’70s and my father was a metallurgical scientist at a research lab in nearby Sterling Forest, NY. One day, probably in 1976 or so, Les Paul showed up at the reception desk of the research lab asking if he could speak to a metals expert.  This was rather unusual, but my dad was the metallurgist who eventually came out to help.  Les and my dad started talking and my dad found that Les had a lot of interesting questions about a metal alloy that he wanted to use for a new guitar pickup he was designing — the alloy needed to have certain properties for the pickup to work as Les wanted, but he didn’t know which alloys could work.  My dad listened and provided some advice, and Les went on his way.  But Les came back to the research lab a few more times over the next few weeks to follow up, and my dad graciously continued to provide his expertise.

At some point, my dad mentioned this at the dinner table, and mentioned that the guy’s name was “Les Paul.”  I should explain that my father knew nothing of contemporary music, unless it was contemporary in the 1700 or 1800’s.  So when I heard at age 13 that it was the great Les Paul, I said, “Dad, do you have any idea who you’re talking to??”  To which he replied, “Yeah, some guy who just wants to pick my brain.”  I proceeded to explain who Les Paul was and why he was important, but it went completely past him.

Now here’s where the story gets interesting:  A year or two later our next door neighbor, Mr. Morrison, had a health issue and found himself in the hospital in Ridgewood.  He was in pre-surgery and was coincidentally sharing a room with Les Paul.  For this part, I don’t fully know what happened and can only repeat what I was told, but the story goes that Les Paul and Mr. Morrison started talking and discovered that they both lived in Mahwah.  That broke the ice, so they were able to go a bit past being just polite “roomies”.  As they talked more and got to know each other, Les eventually told Mr. Morrison that the surgery he was about to undergo was extremely risky (I believe his condition was heart-related), and the doctors in Ridgewood were predicting only a 50% chance of success.  Mr. Morrison apparently convinced Les to get a second opinion.  As a result, Les called off the surgery, found an expert in Cleveland, and learned that he had been misdiagnosed.  So Les was eventually fine, didn’t have risky surgery, and was forever grateful to my next door neighbor for his potentially life-saving advice.

After that, Les started coming by our neighborhood in Scotch Hills fairly often to visit Mr. Morrison.  One day, he pulled up to the curb in his big white Cadillac, saw my father working in the yard, and recognized him from the research lab a couple years back.  Until that moment, neither knew that the other also lived in Mahwah.  Les was still playing with different metal alloys for his new pickup design, so he made the most of this rather unlikely coincidence — when he visited Mr. Morrison on weekend afternoons, often he would also stop by our driveway to “pick my dad’s brain” a little more.  I would sometimes listen in on the conversations, although I can’t say I understood much of what they were saying most of the time.  But Les would often acknowledge me and try to include me in the conversation.  At one point, Les Paul invited my father and our family to his house — he wanted to show us his studio!  But unfortunately I wasn’t listening in on that conversation, so I was not aware of the invitation — or my father’s “no thank you” — until several years later.  To this day I bring this up with my father, but it’s water under the bridge, so all I can do is look at the floor and shake my head.

But I’m pleased to report that my father now fully appreciates the greatness of the man to whom he contributed his metallurgical expertise.  I don’t know if any great guitar innovations resulted from their conversations, but at least I can say that I “knew” the great Les Paul, if only briefly.

It sure would have been awesome to have seen that studio, though….”

Tom Peters