A Look at Mahwah’s Inventors

For a 2015 gallery talk I profiled the following inventors. Click on the links for a short history of each:

A little bit about methodology. All of these inventors hold U.S. Patents on their inventions. I knew from my past research and work in our archives about some of them, so I was able to use Google Scholar (a website that I love) to locate their patents. Put their name, Mahwah and the word patent into the search and up pops reference to their patents and you can download a copy. Edward Gorcyca was unknown to me but his name came up in a search of Brakeshoe Patents Mahwah. Another longtime resident of Cragmere, Rosser Wilson, also came up with a lot of patents at Brakeshoe. Audrey Artusio and Mary Ellen Pryde were very helpful with Robert Armstrong Smith and John Edwards loaned me valuable material about his uncle, Charles Ellis. We have displayed some of his original patents, American and foreign at the gallery talk.

A little background about the patent system. Patents are authorized by Article I, Section 8, clause 8 of the United States Constitution which grants Congress the power to “promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” So under the system that Congress has established, an inventor submits an application to the U.S. Patent Office, an application. This application describes the invention, includes drawings when needed, and sets up the claims that the inventor is making. The claims portion is very important because the inventor gets exclusive rights only in the things he has actually claimed. Once the application has been filed, it is examined by the patent office before the actual patent is issued. The examiner has to determine whether the invention is “novel” and “nonobvious.” To determine whether an invention is “novel” a search is made of all previous patents to see that the new invention does not the same claims that were made before by someone else. The examiner also looks at whether the claims are so obvious that they are already in the public domain. Once the patent office determines to issue a patent it is good for 17 years. But it is subject to challenge by other inventors who can claim infringement of their existing patents. Just because someone has a patent on something doesn’t mean the product is ever made or becomes commercially viable. The filed patents are used by other inventors to improve upon the prior art.

All of the inventors that we will discuss today owned patents. The usual practice is that a patentee is an individual that gets the patent in his own name and then assigns it to the employer for whom he was working when the inventive work was done.

If you know of additional information about any of these inventors, or know of other inventors from Mahwah, please comment below.

 

 

2 Comments On “A Look at Mahwah’s Inventors”

  1. Byrd Avery Lochtie

    Another inventor at Brake Shoe was Ray Schaefer. He, Howard Avery and Rosser Wilson, along with a number of other employees, were involved in the Manhattan Project during WWII. I have a picture of all those employees from a Brake Shoe publication.You may already have that but if not, I can send you a copy with all the names of the employees.

    I also have a great deal of information and memorabilia about my father, Howard S. Avery. You may already have most of it, but I could send you whatever you don’t have.

    I am hoping to be in Mahwah for my High School reunion the weekend of Oct 7-9. If someone could meet me and get me to the museum, I might be able to look at what you have and determine if I have anything to add.

    Thanks,
    Byrd Avery Lochtie

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